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Dissociation and Addiction: The Dilemma of Emotion

This article is now available in the March, 2014 edition of Sober World Magazine (p. 28). The summary and references for this article is provided below: Here I am observing the occurrence of addiction as both an individual and collective experience.  Addiction can be seen as a cyclical, chronic compulsion overwhelming the psyche to seek and use … [Continue]

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I have been dedicating the available time to my studies requiring me to pause the projects concerning my writing. I plan to have some writing available for September. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thank you for your continued interest,

~ Erik

Currently Read Articles:

Spirituality and Addiction: The Bypass of Emotion

For many who struggle with addiction, spirituality can be a part of the journey towards finding sobriety. From a depth psychological perspective, spirituality is the search for wholeness within the psyche. As Corbett (2011) explains “in the broadest sense of the word, everyone has a spirituality of some kind, although not necessarily belief in a … [Continue]

A Paradox: The Chaos of Truth

Datson (2012), author of Soul Spelunker from his entry titled, Pantheism and Panentheism, stated “I don't think it is inconsistent when I contradict myself by asserting two seemingly contrary ideas. There is much truth in paradox. One must attempt to transcend the typical polarities and adhere to the tension of the opposites” (Soul Spelunker, para … [Continue]

Addiction, Allegory, and the Unconscious

Datson (2013) wrote on an intriguing topic of metaphor and allegory, titled "Musings on Metaphor and Allegory" at Soul Spelunker. What intrigues me is how the expressed symbol (through metaphor) may be evoked from what is read, alluding to the hermeneutic process. Quilligan (1979) informed "all true narrative allegory has its source in a cultures … [Continue]

Addiction: The Poetry of Experience

The section of Jung’s (2009) writing that I have chosen speaks to the use of words and expressions of metaphor as a reflection of our past. Among the symbolic psychological references found in this statement are descriptors that carry religious associations and connotations. I present them here not as a reflection of any particular belief system, … [Continue]